Bambusa Tulda

Bambusa Tulda ( Also called Jati, Makor, Makol, Mirtinga, Wati, Owati, Koraincho, Longmeli, Rawthang, Mritanga etc.) is one of the most important species of bamboo.

Bamboo is called the poor man’s timber and India is one of its largest habitats. It is a fast growing species. Ironically classified as a NON TIMBER FOREST PRODUCT, its wood quality is better than any of the hardwoods. It matures in a short period of 3 years, thus also called GREEN GOLD.

I surveyed the viability of including Bambusa Tulda as an agro-forestry crop for Tarai Area to cater to my requirement of a suitable raw material for handicraft industry. Unfortunately, I found it too hollow and its diameter too little to cater to my requirement, and thus I have shelved the idea.

Nevertheless, as a matter of record, I am enlisting certain pertinent findings from what I read and saw.

Bambusa Tulda naturally occurs in parts of N.E India and naturalized in Iraq, Puerto Rico, and parts of South America. It is a tall tropical bamboo, with a long period of vegetative growth. Culms are about 17 to 22 m high, dia about 3 to 6 cm ( 1 to 2 inches),  usually straight, bright to dark green, with streaks of yellow. Wall thickness is around 0.5 to 1.5 cm. It grows well in moist hilly tracts of N.E India and has its applications in basketry and woven handicrafts. It is a good raw material for paper industry.

As per Wikipedia

Young culms are green, which turn greyish green on maturity. Yo! ung shoots are greenish-yellow, with a powdery top. Culms are ! covered with white blooms. A band of white hairs occurs above the nodes. Branching occurs from the base to top. Aerial roots reach up to few nodes above.Culm sheaths are triangular with a conical blade, and straw-colored. The sheath proper is asymmetrical and 15-32 cm in length and 25-34 cm wide. Blade length is 5-10 cm. Auricles are unequal where the large one is rounded and situated on the side of the blade. The upper surface of the sheath is covered with blackish-brown hairs. The lower surface of the sheath is not hairy. Sheaths fall off early

Other Sources-

A farmer’s blog on Bamboo Agro-Forestry http://bamboowoodcraft.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s